Tag Archive for book

“Professional C++, 4th Edition” Released

It has been a lot of work, but I’m proud to announce my fourth edition of “Professional C++” šŸ™‚
It is published by Wiley/Wrox.
And already available at Amazon.

Official Description

Get up to date quickly on the new changes coming with C++17

Professional C++ is the advanced manual for C++ programming. Designed to help experienced developers get more out of the latest release, this book skims over the basics and dives right in to exploiting the full capabilities of C++17. Each feature is explained by example, each including actual code snippets that you can plug into your own applications. Case studies include extensive, working code that has been tested on Windows and Linux, and the author’s expert tips, tricks, and workarounds can dramatically enhance your workflow. Even many experienced developers have never fully explored the boundaries of the language’s capabilities; this book reveals the advanced features you never knew about, and drills down to show you how to turn these features into real-world solutions.

The C++17 release includes changes that impact the way you work with C++; this new fourth edition covers them all, including nested namespaces, structured bindings, string_view, template argument deduction for constructors, parallel algorithms, generalized sum algorithms, Boyer-Moore string searching, string conversion primitives, a filesystem API, clamping values, optional values, the variant type, the any type, and more. Clear explanations and professional-level depth make this book an invaluable resource for any professional needing to get up to date quickly.

  • Maximize C++ capabilities with effective design solutions
  • Master little-known elements and learn what to avoid
  • Adopt new workarounds and testing/debugging best practices
  • Utilize real-world program segments in your own applications

C++ is notoriously complex, and whether you use it for gaming or business, maximizing its functionality means keeping up to date with the latest changes. Whether these changes enhance your work or make it harder depends on how well-versed you are in the newest C++ features. Professional C++ gets you up to date quickly, and provides the answers you need for everyday solutions.

Share

Boost.Asio C++ Network Programming


I recently finished reading “Boost.Asio C++ Network Programming” written by John Torjo and published by Packt Publishing. Information given by the publisher:

Overview:

  • Augment your C++ network programming using Boost.Asio
  • Discover how Boost.Asio handles synchronous and asynchronous programming models
  • Practical examples of client/server applications
  • Learn how to deal with threading when writing network applications
  • Harness the power of Boost with plenty of examples that you can build upon

What you will learn from this book:

  • How to easily reference Boost.Asio programming
  • Synchronous versus asynchronous using Boost.Asio
  • How threading affects programming using Boost.Asio
  • Create your own echo client and server
  • More examples of client/server applications, both synchronous and asynchronous
  • Implement your own asynchronous operations
  • Co-routines: asynchronous operations with a synchronous feel
  • Use Boost.Asio for SSL Networking
  • Debug Boost.Asio
  • Use Boost.Asio for more than just networking

I love the Boost libraries, and I’m interested in network programming, so I decided to read this book. The book has a hands-on approach with a couple of sample programs. What I like is that these sample programs have been structured in such a way so they can be reused for your own projects. They are like skeleton examples, and all source code can be downloaded from the book’s website.

The book does not cover any real networking theory. For example don’t expect an in-depth discussion of how the TCP, UDP, or ICMP protocols work; that’s not the goal of this book. The goal is to show, with practical examples, how to use the Boost.Asio networking library.

While reading chapter 1, my initial reaction to the contents was rather negative. Chapter 1 is a bit convoluted, not so easy to understand, and even has a couple of errors in it. However, subsequent chapters are structured more logically and are understandable, though sometimes a discussion accompanying a piece of code can be a bit brief.

As an introduction to the library, Chapter 3 shows a basic Echo client/server example which is quite good. There is a synchronous and asynchronous TCP implementation of the client and server, and also a synchronous UDP implementation of the client and server. Subsequent chapters implement more useful client/server applications.

The book is not your one-stop destination for everything related to the Boost.Asio library, but it’s a great introduction to get you started with the library, to get to know the terminology used in the library, to learn about the difference between synchronous and asynchronous programming, to learn how to use multi-threading using the Boost threading library, and to get nice skeleton applications that you can reuse in your own projects. Several skeleton applications are provided such as synchronous and asynchronous versions, and single-threaded and multi-threaded versions.

Share

Professional C++, 2nd Edition, Extract

DeveloperFusion has posted an extract from my book “Professional C++, 2nd Edition”. The extract explains constructors in C++11.
You can read it here.
For more information about the book, source code, sample chapters, the book forum and other resources, go to the book’s homepage on wrox.com.

Share

“Professional C++, Second Edition” Featured on the Microsoft VC++ Team Blog

My book “Professional C++, Second Edition”, published by Wiley/Wrox, is now featured in a dedicated post on the Microsoft Visual C++ Team Blog šŸ™‚
Read the VC++ Team Blog post here.

Share

Work On My Book “Professional C++, Second Edition” Is Finished

I just finished everything for my book “Professional C++, Second Edition” by Wiley/Wrox šŸ™‚
I think it will go on sale maybe around October, I don’t know the exact date yet.
After a bit more than a year of work, itā€™s finished šŸ˜€
It was really a huge amount of work, but it was definitely worth it, and a very interesting experience.

Here is the official link.

Share